Hong Kong

This phone is not a phone

My Nokia phone broke down about a month ago, after great lifetime. So, I went to one of the many electronics shops in Hong Kong and opted to replace it with a HUAWEI P20 Pro. It has rather high specs and is marketed by having a co-designed camera with Leica. Quickly I figured that this phone is not a phone. It is more of a pocket computer with a quite good camera, which can also to phone calls. I always thought that taking photos with a phone is more of Lomographie than photography. But have a look yourself below: these photos are all unedited, like they came out.

Hong Kong Park on the morning run

Hong Kong Park on the morning run

Lock Cha Tea House, where I tend to hold my “office hours”

Lock Cha Tea House, where I tend to hold my “office hours”

Hong Kong Park view

Hong Kong Park view

Chinese lanterns in Macau

Chinese lanterns in Macau

Grand Lisboa Hotel in Macau

Grand Lisboa Hotel in Macau

Pawn shops are the real center of power. If in a prime location, you just sit on this land with a building like this, then you don’t need the money of the developers.

Pawn shops are the real center of power. If in a prime location, you just sit on this land with a building like this, then you don’t need the money of the developers.

Street in Macau, where I stayed.

Street in Macau, where I stayed.

Macau is full of sharks. Here one of them.

Macau is full of sharks. Here one of them.

Macau Ferry Terminal upon arrival in Hong Kong

Macau Ferry Terminal upon arrival in Hong Kong

Lamma Island towards the South, seen from Mount Stenhouse.

Lamma Island towards the South, seen from Mount Stenhouse.

The Bauhinia flower is the Hong Kong, city flower. It is also symbolic on Hong Kong’s map.

The Bauhinia flower is the Hong Kong, city flower. It is also symbolic on Hong Kong’s map.

Fallen Bauhinia on the granite staircase up the Hong Kong Zoological Garden.

Fallen Bauhinia on the granite staircase up the Hong Kong Zoological Garden.

Message found under the rock

In November 2016 I left a student feedback pack and a letter on the South of Lamma Island, behind Mount Stenhouse (click here for previous blogpost). Two months later, in January 2017, an expedition of students from the Master in International Management of Tilburg University made an attempt to reach the location. They came very close, but needed to abort (rightly so) due to the risk of getting caught in the jungle in the dark. Now, in December 2017, I am happy to receive news from to me unknown fellow hikers in Hong Kong: the letter was found. Both, the fact that they climbed up there and secondly that they had sharp eyes (finding a hidden letter under a rock), makes me think they are nice people. Thanks for mailing back, and I hope we can join for a hike one day when I am back in Hong Kong. Inspired by this, when the currents around the Maltese Island are heading towards the Libyan coast, and the winds are Northerlies, I will also launch a message in a bottle. How anachronistic in the world of instant social media. But it's just nicer.

The cover of the letter I left on Mount Stenhouse, found and photographed by Alex Leung

The cover of the letter I left on Mount Stenhouse, found and photographed by Alex Leung

My Eleventh year of Hong Kong

I am again leaving Hong Kong at the end of my latest stay. Now it is the 11th year, since the territory was my home and later my destination. The tree I planted five years ago in the jungle of Lamma Island has been succeeding in its struggle for light, and is now ranking above the bushes. The Bauhinia tree in front of my guesthouse window, at the steep edge of the campus of the University of Hong Kong, blossomed late this year. It was an exceptionally warm autumn. I will continue returning to Asia in the years to come. Even though Hong Kong is in a self induced decay, it is still a base in the centre of an exciting world region. And when it further merges in the Pearl River Delta region, it will also have a broader role to play again. Never the less, the size of such, is not why I am here anyway. 

Bauhinia tree outside my window.

Bauhinia tree outside my window.

Dezső Bozóky's Pictures of the Past

Following the advise not to do physical exercise after receiving my influenza vaccination (colloquially also known as flu shot or even "jab" for those who prefer to speak reduced vocabulary), I decided to instead visit the University Museum and Art Gallery of The University of Hong Kong. This is one of the few cultural stepping stones, you may set foot on when walking the territory, and not wanting to dip into shopping malls and crowds. I was attracted this time by the photo exhibition featuring the pictures of the Hungarian the surgeon Dr. Dezső Bozóky, taken during his travels in East Asia 1907-1909, and illustrating his impressions by quotes from his diary. As we all know, it was a very different Hong Kong back then. 

Man Mo Temple,124–126 Hollywood Road (  1908)

Man Mo Temple,124–126 Hollywood Road (1908)

I liked the exhibition a lot (which will be on until January 8th), and also I spent quite some time with studying the catalogue which is a documentation of views and thoughts by the visiting photographer from a different time. It is available for 150 HK$ (about 18 Euros) in the museum's tea house, which is also recommended, and one of the places I like to hang out when I am here. The rest of the museum is either redecorating or lost a few of its exhibits from the accessible areas. But it is still a nice place with a long gone Hong Kong spirit.

Queen's Building, Central waterfront, and Kowloon Ferry Pier (  1908)

Queen's Building, Central waterfront, and Kowloon Ferry Pier (1908)

60 Queen's Road,   looking towards the Pedder Street Clock Tower (1908)

60 Queen's Road, looking towards the Pedder Street Clock Tower (1908)

Dezső Bozóky's photos show street scenes, portraits and landscapes of and in Hong Kong 1907-1909. They are presented as glass slides of about 30 cm x 30 cm and are partially hand coloured.

Dezső Bozóky's photos show street scenes, portraits and landscapes of and in Hong Kong 1907-1909. They are presented as glass slides of about 30 cm x 30 cm and are partially hand coloured.

Cover pages of the catalogue and exhibition leaflet

Cover pages of the catalogue and exhibition leaflet

Storm landed

Today, I ran up to the Victoria Peak, not just for normal exercise, but to observe the landing of the tropical cyclone "Haima". First comes absolute silence, then rain, then torrential floods, and then the furious wind kicks in. It seems most people observed the warning not to go outside, and the loneliness added to the spectacular atmosphere. As I was brought up in a forest, I followed my instinct which path to take and which other to avoid. You get a feeling, which tree will hold and which one might not. But it's of course not more than a feeling. The best is to stay away from them - if you can. Just a falling branch can cause serious damage.

Hong Kong in suspense, waiting for Taifun "Haima". Just before noon time on the 21st of October, 2016.

Hong Kong in suspense, waiting for Taifun "Haima". Just before noon time on the 21st of October, 2016.

Back to campus

Hong Kong neither feels home anymore, nor in any way exotic. Don't know what it really is for me at this point in time. To be fair, this time I have not seen much, because I was extremely occupied last week and spent my time in Cyberport. Now I am back to campus. Let's see what I will discover in the month to come.

Back to campus in Pokfulam

Back to campus in Pokfulam

Bel Air residential development adjacent to Cyberport. Not really thinking outside the box.

Bel Air residential development adjacent to Cyberport. Not really thinking outside the box.

View from the new part of the main University campus

View from the new part of the main University campus

Life at the Westwood exit of the MTR (subway) station Hong Kong University.

Life at the Westwood exit of the MTR (subway) station Hong Kong University.

Sad news in Hong Kong

I arrived in Hong Kong. Watched two movies on the flight. One was "Steve Jobs". I think I could follow the plot quite well, because I know most of the Apple products and versions of the company's early days. Also, I read the Steve Job biography before, even I don't fancy very much what I know about his personality. I have my own experiences working with assholes, who blow their technical incompetence into the genius miracle saga orbit by an aggressive ego. But I have no first hand experience with Steve Jobs, so I can't say anything about him. The other movie was the latest James Bond, called Spectre. Car was okay (Aston Martin DB10), bond girl also (Lea Seydoux). Then I fell asleep a few hours.

What struck me upon arrival, was the message that our good friend Peter Olaf Looms suffered a fatal heart attack in Argentina. He was travelling to visit family with his wife Clementina. Last thing I saw from him was a question on how to reduce evaporation from a water reservoir. Then the communication halted on October 2nd. He died October 3rd. I am very sad about this. In April this year, we all still were greeting summer with a glass of wine, over the Grand Harbour of Valletta. We strolled around Malta and Gozo together and took a shaky boat into the Blue Grotto. 

We met Peter the first time at the breakfast room of the University guesthouse. He was a new arrival to the other Professors who were meeting there every morning. I remember, that I asked Feibai who he was, and she said: "I don't know. But he is a very intelligent man". Peter became Feibai's mentor and choached her for her research proposal for the Frankfurt School of Management and Finance, where she is now doing her PhD. No matter where in the world the other one was, these two were on WeChat every day - exchanging papers, and thoughts and questions. Slowly I learned, how much energy Peter had, and how committed he was to guide his mentees. And I also slowly grasped how many of them there were, and over how many years, and where on the planet. Everywhere. Some of them turned into respected intellectuals and scientists. Others into political dissidents. From Bolivia to China, Peter shaped ideas and lives. He was in the end even my mentor, because I admire how he did that. Now he is gone. Not just, he did not come back to our little circle in the breakfast room, where we all have been expecting him. He is away. I am really sad. Everybody is. 

Morning walk after a rainy night in Pokfulam. Taifun warning signal #1 hoisted today.

Morning walk after a rainy night in Pokfulam. Taifun warning signal #1 hoisted today.

I am staying away from the buzz of Hong Kong these days. The touch down in the guesthouse was a good start. Then moved to hotel closer to Cyberport for a week, for practical reasons. Hotels rarely have an atmosphere I really like. It is a nice hotel. But I think, if you travelled a lot, you might know what I mean.

It's Friday. The English leftovers and new arrivals are getting drunk in the hotel bar by this time of the week. The prostitutes from Shenzhen are preparing for a hard working night. And the sun has set over the Lamma Island Strait.

Evening view from Telegraph Bay to Lantau Island.

Evening view from Telegraph Bay to Lantau Island.

Thank you and good bye

Last Saturday I taught the last class of my course on "Management Consulting" in the MBA Programme of The University of Hong Kong. As often said, you learn things by teaching them. It is because, you have to do the abstraction first, before you can teach. And in this case, I enjoyed it even more, because I had very smart students. My guest speakers, Joanne Ooi, Thomas Lesinski and Feibai made it even more colorful. Great fun. This, and of course the very nice faculty interaction at the Faculty of Business and Economics, made me decide that I will come back later this year. For now, it is time to say thank you and good bye. But  also, as it is a term in anglo-american environments: take care and stay in touch. And I mean it. 

PMBA6016 exhausted but still smiling at the end of an intensive course. 

PMBA6016 exhausted but still smiling at the end of an intensive course. 

After a whole day teaching on Saturday, our Sunday was quiet and we started off with a long morning walk up to the little and less visited summits around The Peak. I will resume on the basic concept of not working on weekends, I think. As our next stop is Australia, this will come quite naturally, I guess. In the afternoon, we went to a movie theatre to see a performance of National Theatre Live in London. It is really a great idea for a Performing Arts venue, to reach out to a world audience this war. Very well made.

We watched Frankenstein with Benedict Cumberbatch and Jonny Lee Miller. Watch trailer by clicking here. It was amazing. Of course, it is different than being in the theatre in London. But it also has its advantages, as you have the best angles through the camera and are not bound to your seat. The performance itself was spectacular. I was shivering in my seat, not because it is "horror", but because of the way the rather deep story was represented. Back to the campus, I swiftly signed up for their Newsletter (which I do rarely) and started to re-read Mary Shelley's novel. 

First week in Hong Kong

Since I have arrived in Hong Hong I have been preparing course material, teaching a class of smart students at HKU, and catching up with friends. The week passed by very quickly, and perhaps I should have scheduled more than a month in town. But we can always come back. Yesterday, we visited my friend Magnus Barlett in his habitat on Lamma Island - the publisher of wonderful books and maps and owner of Odyssey Publishing Company. It is always a nice trip over to the island, specially off the beaten tracks. Sure, there is a bit of melancholy swinging for me when setting foot on the island. There were times I thought I should have never left it, perhaps like the pianist in the movie 1900. We had coffee on his sunny terrace and seafood, as you should never miss it, when you come here. Magnus' parents were painters and at his wall, in his study, he has a painting by his father, showing a bedroom in their house in Greece. It immediately resonated with me, like Chambre a Arles. I like it a lot.

Room in Greece (Bartlett Sr., as taken with a point and shoot camera on Magnus' wall - against the South China sea sunlight coming in from the right)

Room in Greece (Bartlett Sr., as taken with a point and shoot camera on Magnus' wall - against the South China sea sunlight coming in from the right)

Last chance to see

Currently I am thinking about categories and the structure of a new photo website, which presumably comes life in mid 2013. It will be running parallel to this blog, but with a specialized dedication to photography. One of the categories I set up already has the title "Last chance to see", and is of course inspired by the book of Douglas Adams having the same name.

I was re-insured that it is good to take pictures of things, scenes and people which might disappear. So much does in Mainland China, but also elsewhere. On January 1st I opened the South China Morning Post and read, that from that day trawler fishing in Hong Kong waters is banned. This is for good reason, as it depletes the fish population, is indiscriminate and damages the seabed. But still I will miss the trawlers, which for me have been such a typical sight in Hong Kong. For years I watched them passing bye my window when I looked up from my desk, and I got used to the deep sound of their diesel engines. They were often a good object for a photo and I was not aware that when I take them, I record an endangered species of boat and profession.

On the fast ferry from Hong Kong to Macao on December 29th, I still saw many passing the outer island Cheung Chau. At that moment, I was not aware, that this was another "last chance to see".

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